Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties

George Washington Gilbert

Male 1859 - 1938  (79 years)


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  • Name George Washington Gilbert 
    Born 10 Mar 1859  Catlin, Illinois Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 12 May 1938  Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I000012  Tree1
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2019 

    Father Unknown Gilbert,   b. Danville, Vermillion Co. IL Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F00031  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Neta Olive Plummer,   b. 23 Jun 1868, Douglas, Poppawatomie County, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 7 May 1947, Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 78 years) 
    Married 2 Apr 1886  Douglas, Butler County, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Mary Myrtle Gilbert,   b. 14 May 1887, Butler County, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Nov 1889, Latham, Kansas Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 2 years)
     2. Bertha Viola Gilbert,   b. 30 Oct 1890,   d. 1972  (Age 81 years)
     3. Eva De Vern Gilbert,   b. 22 Sep 1893, Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Neta Marie Gilbert,   b. 6 Jan 1896, Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location
     5. Edith Ruth Kate Gilbert,   b. 21 Nov 1898, Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 10 Jul 1986, Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 87 years)
     6. George Carl Gilbert,   b. 18 Sep 1901, Indian Territory, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1967  (Age 65 years)
     7. Cleo Adella Gilbert,   b. 18 Nov 1907, Stillwater, Payne County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 13 Jan 1997, Chickasha, Grady County, Oklahoma Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 89 years)
    Last Modified 19 Mar 2019 
    Family ID F00030  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • Company D and I from Catlin, Thirty-fifth Illinois Infantry

      buried in Spring Hill cemetery?

      THIRTY-FIFTH REGIMENT ILLINOIS INFANTRY.

      This regiment, nearly five companies of which were from Vermilion County,
      was organized at Decatur on the 3d of July, 1861, and was one of the very first
      to go forward to defend the country from the rebel hordes who were not only
      threatening the life of the nation, but whose grasp seem to be already
      encircling it.

      Companies D, E, F and I were almost wholly from this county, and also a
      large number of Company A, the last named being under the command of Captain
      Philip D. Hammond, of Danville. Company D was raised in Catlin, and had for its
      officers William Timmons, captain; U. J. Fox, first lieutenant, and Josiah
      Timmons, second lieutenant. Company E was officered by William L. Oliver, L. J.
      Eyman, and George C. Maxon, captain, first and second lieutenants, respectively.
      This company was raised in the townships of Georgetown and Carroll. Company F
      was a Danville company, and had for captain, A. C. Keys; first lieutenant, John
      Q. A. Luddington, and second lieutenant, J. M. Sinks. Company I was raised in
      the vicinity of Catlin and Fairmount. Of this company, A. B. B. Lewis was
      elected captain; Joseph Truax, first, and Joseph F. Clise, second lieutenant.

      In the organization of the regiment, W. P. Chandler, of Danville, was
      elected lieutenant-colonel; and, by the disabling of Col. Smith at the battle of
      Pea Ridge, Colonel Chandler was put in command, and was afterward promoted to
      the office.

      On the 23d of July the regiment was accepted as Colonel G. A. Smith's
      Independent Regiment of Illinois Volunteers, and on the 4th of August left
      Decatur for the theater of war. The regiment arrived at Jefferson barracks,
      Missouri, the next day, where it remained one week, and then removed to Marine
      Hospital, St. Louis, where it was mustered into service. On the 5th of September
      it was transported by rail to Jefferson City, Missouri, and from thence, on the
      15th of October, to Sedalia, to join Gen. Sigel's advance on Springfield,
      arriving at that point on the 26th of October. From November 13 to 19 the
      regiment was on the march from Springfield to Rolla. From January 24, 1862, the
      army to which the Thirty-fifth was attached was in pursuit of Gen. Price, and
      here our regiment began to experience a taste of real war. At the memorable
      battle of Pea Ridge the regiment took active part, and lost in killed and
      wounded a number of its bravest men, among the wounded being Col. Smith. At the
      siege of Corinth the regiment took an important part, and was at that place upon
      its evacuation on the 30th of May. At Perryville and Stone River the regiment
      was also engaged, at the later place losing heavily in killed and wounded. This
      was during the first three days of January, 1863. The regiment wlas the first on
      the south side of the Tennessee River, crossing that stream on the 28th of
      August. At the battle of Chickamauga, September 20, the regiment was engaged,
      and again suffered severely. By the 22d of September the regiment was at
      Chattanooga.

      In the battle of Missionary Ridge, on November 23-5, the regiment was
      placed in a most dangerous and important position, being in the front line, and
      displayed great valor and coolness, being led to within twenty steps of the
      rebel works on the crest of the hill. In the assault all of the color-guard were
      shot down, and Col. Chandler carried the flag into the enemy's works, followed
      by his men. By December 7 the regiment was at Knoxville, from which point it was
      sent on various important and dangerous expeditions. The regiment was assigned
      to duty next in the Atlanta campaign, and to recount all of the incidents,
      skirmishes and fights in which the Thirty-fifth took part would be only to
      repeat what has been said over and over again in regard to other regiments. The
      reader will simply turn to the story as related elsewhere, and appropriate it
      here. Suffice it to say that at Rocky Face, Resaca, Dallas, Mud Creek and
      Kennesaw the regiment was fully tested in coolness and bravery, and never
      disappointed its commanders. On the 31st of August the regiment started to
      Springfield, Illinois, where it was mustered out on the 27th of September, 1864.

      The board of trustees selected two acres of land just north of the west
      end of Main street as it was then. Upon his land the two-story building was put
      up. This building now faces Pine street, a little north of Main street. This
      school was the only institution of higher learning in Danville for a year.
      The Independent Order of Odd Fellows were granted a charter for their lodge in
      Danville, July 25, 1850. The charter members were John L. Tincher, Samuel
      Frazier, J. B. Gilbert, Joshua Hollingsworth and H. J. C. Batch.


      In 1867 the old charter of Danville was burned in a fire which destroyed
      the records of the city, and a new one was granted. The city was operated under
      this charter until 1874, when it was incorporated under the general act of 1872.

      Catlin by Wabash R. R. elevation 668 ft.

      Duverne Dawson, called 23 Jan 03, Rob Walker was half brother from N.Y.