Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties

Alexander Marshall Paxton

Male 1816 - 1851  (35 years)


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  • Name Alexander Marshall Paxton  [1
    Born 4 Feb 1816  Washington, Mason County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Gender Male 
    Died 12 Feb 1851  Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky. Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Person ID I004925  Tree1
    Last Modified 8 May 2021 

    Father James Alexander Paxton,   b. 13 Sep 1788, Rockbridge County, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 25 Oct 1825, Washington, Mason County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 37 years) 
    Mother Anna Maria Marshall,   b. 20 Jul 1795, Mason County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 6 Feb 1824, Columbus, Ohio Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 28 years) 
    Married 2 May 1811  Mason County, Kentucky Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Family ID F03525  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sally Bush,   b. 2 Apr 1823, Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky. Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 24 Jun 1854, Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky. Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 31 years) 
    Married 12 Feb 1851  Covington, Kenton County, Kentucky. Find all individuals with events at this location  [1
    Last Modified 8 May 2021 
    Family ID F03586  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • [Paxton.FTW]

      858 (a) ALEX. MARSHALL PAXTON, b. in Washington, Kentucky., February 4, 1816, d. in Covington, Kentucky., February 12, 1851, = in Covington, Kentucky., October 22, 1840, SALLIE BUSH, b. April 2, 1823, d. June 24, 1854, in Covington, Kentucky. My brother was called Marshall or "Mat." From his infancy he stuttered, and the mercantile business was selected for him. After receiving a good English education at Augusta College, and a smattering of Latin, from his cousin, Dr. J. A. McClung (272), he went to Cincinnati as a clerk in the wholesale grocery house of Kilgour, Taylor & Co. Here he remained until his majority, when he, with another clerk, started the wholesale house of Paxton & Keys, on Main street. Keys was a splendid salesman, and Marshall an excellent bookkeeper and correspondent The young men met with favor, and did a large business. After a few years, Lafayette Maltby (652) became a partner, and stationed himself at New Orleans; and branches were established at Rio and Havana. His marriage was extremely fortunate. Sister Sallie was one of the most amiable young ladies that I ever met. She made my brother's home an Eden of delight. She was a favorite among her husband's relatives. He was supremely blest in his lovely wife and blooming daughter (2164). They were beautiful in their lives, and in death they were not divided. At the age of thirty-five, he died of disease of the kidneys; and a few years later his widow followed him. They are buried at Covington. On the death of my brother, our sister Mary (856) wrote me a long letter, which is now mislaid. Sister Phoebe (188), in a letter dated April 16, 1851, writes: "Sister wrote you immediately on the death of our dear brother, and told you about his last days. It will be gratifying to you to know that Marshall, though delirious, mentioned you three times in the last day of his life. He appeared conscious that you were not near him, and was, I think, very anxious to see you. Brother, I think we will all be short lived. Our parents were so before us, and one of our number being taken, should warn us to prepare for death. God in his mercy grant that this effect may be produced on all of us. I send you a small lock of Marshall's hair." [Now before me.]

      (b) I copy a letter from sister Sallie, dated Covington, Kentucky., May 4, 1851: "DEAR Brother--I send you by mail a likeness of your dear deceased brother. I would have sent it sooner, knowing it would have been a gratification to you to even see his likeness, but I have been entirely unfitted for anything. It is a copy of one I had, and therefore not so good a likeness. When Marshall received your letter desiring him to send you his likeness, he said it was just what he had been thinking of doing, and that he wanted yours. It would give me much satisfaction to have your likeness, and also to receive letters from you. The happiness and prosperity of your family will always be a subject of great interest to me. Lydia is in fine health. She feels more and more, every day, the loss of her dear father. My health is not good, but I have a great desire to live for the sake of my child. There are none who can supply the place of parents. I was much in hopes we would see you this spring. Lydia will write to you soon. I heard from sister Mary (856) and Phoebe (188) a short time ago. They were all well. Love to your wife. Ever your sister, Sallie P. Paxton." My brother lived most of his married life with his father-in-law, Philip Bush, one of the best men I ever knew. In 1870, I called at his house in Covington to see him. He was not at home, but I was told he could be found in the cemetery. All his family, except one daughter, were there, and he desired to be near them. He therefore had had himself appointed superintendent of the grounds, and he busied himself in making green the graves of those he loved. I went to the cemetery to meet him, and to drop a tear on my brother's grave. I found him there with several hands improving the grounds. But Oh, how he was changed! He was now unconcerned about this life. His dear ones and his home were beyond the skies. Instead of the genial, hearty salutation of his early life, he met me with a tear. Not long afterwards he was gathered to his own. While his dear ones lived, he was one of the most cordial and agreeable men I ever met. It was sunshine to the heart to be in his company. His unbounded love for "Marshall," and his perfect confidence in him, were his favorite themes. On the occasion referred to, he spoke of him so feelingly that my own grief was lost in his superior sorrow. When I look back to the dark and cheerless years of my brother's orphanage, I rejoice that he had ten years of married bliss, while surrounded by intelligent Christian friends, who loved and almost adored him. I will add the inscriptions on their tombs:


      "MARSHALL PAXTON, born February 4, 1819; died February 12, 1851. And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes, and there shall be no more death. Rev. 21: 4."

      "SALLY PENDLETON, daughter of PHILIP S. and V. BUSH, and wife of A. M. PAXTON, born April 2, 1823; died June 24, 1854. Looking unto Jesus. These all died in faith."

  • Sources 
    1. [S044832] Paxton.FTW.
      Date of Import: Jul 20, 2002

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