Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia's Northern Neck Counties

Samuel Alexander Dr. Mudd

Male 1833 - 1883  (49 years)


Personal Information    |    Notes    |    All    |    PDF

  • Name Samuel Alexander Dr. Mudd 
    Born 20 Dec 1833  Oak Hill, Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Died 10 Jan 1883  Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried St. Mary's Catholic Church, Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I79313  Tree1
    Last Modified 21 Oct 2021 

    Father Henry Mudd,   b. 1 Sep 1798, Trinity Parish, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 3 Sep 1877, Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 79 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Mother Sarah Anne Reeves,   b. 1811, Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 31 Dec 1868, Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 57 years) 
    Relationship natural 
    Married 21 Oct 1826  Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Family ID F39592  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

    Family Sarah Frances Dyer,   b. 15 Mar 1835, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 29 Nov 1911, Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 76 years) 
    Married 26 Nov 1857  Bryantown, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Thomas Dyer Mudd,   b. 6 Jun 1862, Charles County, Maryland Find all individuals with events at this location  [natural]
    Last Modified 21 Oct 2021 
    Family ID F39591  Group Sheet  |  Family Chart

  • Notes 
    • ===
      Essex County, Virginia Historical Society, Bulletin 23, Nov 1983
      Mr. Carroll Garnett, a native of Essex, has made a specialty of writing and speaking on events concerning
      the War Between the States. Mr. Garnett's subject for today's talk was The Physician who treated and pronounced John Wilkes Booth dead. Many of us had always heard this physician was Dr. Samuel A. Mudd, who was convicted on a charge of treating John Wilkes Booth. A paper by a descendant of Dr. Mudd has been filed to
      refute this charge and to clear Dr. Mudd's name.
      On Mr. Garnett's research he has discovered the physician from Port Royal who had attended Booth was Dr.
      Charles Urquhart, who had married a great aunt of the Garnetts. Dr. Urquhart's home was down river near a
      ferry landing from Port Conway, a mile from Port Royal. Dr. Urquhart's father was born in Scotland near Urquhart
      Castle. He came to Fredericksburg when he was 25 and became a well known property owner, having a tract near Germanna in Orange County. He was a member of the same Masonic Lodge as George Washington. His son , Dr. Charles Urquhart, Jr ., one of three sons, settled in Port Royal and was a leader in the Masonic Lodge here, which was the second oldest in Virginia . He was a vestryman of St. Peter's Church.
      Just after word had been received of the Appomattox surrender and about Lincoln's being shot in Ford's Theater, a search party under Lt. E. P Doherty of 27 soldiers arrived at Port Conway and was trying to find John Wilkes Booth, who was supposed to be traveling with David Herold , and they thought he was in this vicinity.
      The search party learned that five men crossed the river from Port Conway to Port Royal and one man approached a house asking for shelter. He was told anybody would help them on the way or to find the Garrett farm. Mr. Garrett agreed to take them in, thinking they were Confederate soldiers. Willie Jett, one of three Confederate soldiers, accompanied them to the Garrett farm . David Herold and John Wilkes Booth, who had been
      shot , spent the night in the Tobacco Barn, and were located hiding there early in the morning of April 26th.
      John Wilkes Booth's lady love was Izora Gouldman, whose family ran Gouldman's Tavern in Bowling Green.
      It was thought that Booth and Herold were probably trying to get there for help when they were apprehended in
      the barn by a troop of Union soldiers who wanted to take them back, dead or alive , and insisted on taking him
      regardless of his physical condition. One man asked Dr. Urquhart to see Booth . He found him bleeding from a
      neck wound . He expected him to die within the hour.
      Dr. Urquhart died in 1866 and his widow came to Essex to live with relatives at Hill & Dale. So Mr. Garnett
      tied the story to Essex this way and through references to the Gouldmans and others who found their way to Essex after the War.

Research Links  Find Samuel Alexander Dr. Mudd at the following sites -

Ancestry records for Samuel Alexander Dr. Mudd